Winter 2018 NAACCR Narrative Leave a comment


Recinda Sherman, MPH, PhD, CTR
NAACCR Program Manager of Data Use and Research
rsherman@naaccr.org

 

 

Well, we made it through another successful Call for Data (CFD) season! And the cycle of work for many of us has now turned squarely towards data use. Work on our CiNA monographs is underway, data use requests are in process, and papers using the CiNA data are under review. And I am excited to begin evaluating the supplemental tract-level, area-based social measures (ABSM) that were submitted.

Feature Your Work:

The first blog posted to the NAACCReview was on March 30, 2015, to announce that year’s publication of the inter-agency collaborative, Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer. Since then, we have highlighted cancer surveillance-related research publications about once a month. Many of the blogs have focused on the work of NAACCR members.

We encourage you to read up on your colleagues work as well as submit your own work to be featured in NAACCReview. You may access NAACCReview using the “Useful Link” at the bottom of our main webpage or by clicking here: https://www.naaccr.org/blog/ to see our latest blogs.

To submit to NAACCReview, please send your article or report (attached or link), your headshot or employer logo, and a contextual summary of your work to me at rsherman@naaccr.org. Please contact me if you have any questions.

Call for Data Highlights:

  • Using NAACCRPrep, registries had the option to submit an XML version of their submission file. We received 26 XML submissions out of 70 registries.
  • We are beginning the process of evaluating 12 month data for the incorporating into the delay adjusted model. As of this writing, 42 registries have submitted their 12 month data and 12 more indicated they would submit by January 31st, 2018.
  • Also through NAACCRPrep, US registries had the option to submit additional, tract-level ABSM for assessment and evaluation of an SES Index (Yost Index) as well as the development of more appropriate summary codes to evaluate the impact of poverty on poor and minority populations. These data were appended to cases that had a 2010 census tract boundary. We received this supplemental data from 52 of 57 US registries.

Geocoding Updates:

  • Many registries worked fast and furious to complete geocoding in time for CFD. More than half, 35 of 57 US registries use the NAACCR Geocoder. The NAACCR Geocoder is built into SEER*DMS, so any registries, mostly SEER registries, using that system use the NAACCRGeocoder. Many worked with IMS to update batches of their cases to accommodate for the improvements in geocoding accuracy in the version released in June 2017. In addition, 28 registries not using SEER*DMS, mostly NPCR registries, geocoded nearly 6 million cases in the past 5 months. This represents tremendous efforts on the part of the registries.
  • To obtain the highest quality and greatest coverage of the geocoded data requires manual review. Of the US registries, 31 of the 57 performed some level of manual (visual and interactive) review of cases. We plan to release our new Manual Geocoding Interface before the annual conference to assist in resolving ungeocodable cases or low quality matches that require interactive review.
  • As mentioned in the previous Narrative, an in-person Geocoding Training will be available at the NAACCR Annual Conference in Pittsburgh this June. This training will provide recommended methods for data cleaning and geocoding. The course will also describe the new quality variables available in the NAACCR Geocoder, how to incorporate Alias Tables, and how to use the new “Match Status” variable and Manual Geocoding Interface.
  • Sometimes our best laid plans go awry, and the same is true for the NAACCR Geocoder. We recently had a few hours of downtime due to a burst pipe in the data center where the servers are stored. When this happens, we place a notice on the MyNAACCR log-in page. So check there when you log-in for time sensitive notices.
  • And a reminder about using ACCESS databases with the NAACCR Geocoder. We actively discourage the use of ACCESS databases with the NAACCR Geocoder. From a user perspective, ACCESS files are extremely slow to process. Also, Windows Updates can cause issues with for a variety of reasons. A recent Windows Update is current impacting the NAACCR Geocoder’s ability to write to the ACCESS files. It will take time for our developer to investigate the update problem, so ACCESS files are not supported until the issue is resolved. Luckily, it is simple process to convert from ACCESS to a CSV and back again. However, use caution with variable definitions so that leading zeros for zip and FIPS codes are not dropped.
  • As mentioned in the previous Narrative, an in-person Geocoding Training will be available at the NAACCR Annual Conference in Pittsburgh this June. This training will provide recommended methods for data cleaning and geocoding. The course will also describe the new quality variables available in the NAACCR Geocoder, how to incorporate Alias Tables, and how to use the new “Match Status” variable and Manual Geocoding Interface.

An Eye to the Future:

As we move forward with improvements in the quality and coverage of our geocoded data, NAACCR will evaluate the possibility of a new CiNA Spatial Dataset. Registries, that are able to participate, will provide census tract as well as the appended ABSMs. This special dataset will enable national-level geospatial research by NAACCR members with approved protocol and registry consent. If you are interesting in being part of the development process for that dataset, please contact me.

 

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Copyright © 2016 NAACCR, Inc. All Rights Reserved | See NAACCR Partners and Sponsors